Throwback Thursday

Greetings Readers,

Glitz. Glamor. Large parties. These words can only resonate with one time period, the 1920’s. More popularly known as the Roaring Twenties due to the escalating economy, enhancements made on technology improving peoples lives, large parties and increasing social scenes the 1920’s was also a period of innovation and artistic reform. Inspired by the eccentric and modern style Art Nouveau and embracing the heavy new industrialization of cities emerged a new sensational, international style that would be known as Art Deco. Art Deco began in France, appearing shortly after the first World War and increasingly became more popular until its popularity dwindled after the second World War. Art Deco reflected integrated and correlative design using extravagant materials and design features that favored esthetic more than comfort.

Architecturally, the most iconic contribution from the Art Deco style is the skyscraper. Although there had been precedents, the newer skyscrapers gave their architects challenging tasks by trying to meet their clients needs and staying within the parameters of code requirements. Particularly the 1916 New York zoning law, which required all building of a certain elevation to be set back to allow light and air to the streets. Conclusively, their designs resulted in sleek, sculpturally, sophisticated buildings which altered future skyscrapers across the nation. One of the most exemplary skyscrapers is the Chrysler building in New York City. Constructed by William Van Alen for the Chrysler corporation it was briefly the tallest building in the world. Compromised of stainless steel tower and white trimmed gray brick, the Chrysler building was automobile inspired, particularly in the ornamentation, such as hood ornament inspired gargoyles and chevrons emphasizing motion of the escalating stainless steel tower.

Chrysler- google
image from google

Interiors at this were embracing traditional designs with the new esthetics of Art Deco. Interior design as a profession became more popular and numerous commissions were being made. Designers were in heavy demand due to the large requests and more refined tastes. Art Deco interiors were luxurious and modern designs, colors more saturated and brighter, including elements from traditional styles such as French Rococo, but incorporating newer design elements that reflect the industrial and culture innovations.

art deco
Image from google

Mystic Valley Traders very own Radiance Steel collection embodies aspects of the Art Deco time period. The radiant gray pattern gleams like stainless steel, and the naturalist design encompasses the natural motifs that were seen during this time.

radiance steel

I hope you all have enjoyed todays throwback!

Lauren